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MikeRobinson
Forum Full Member


Registered: 08/29/11
Posts: 638
Location: Nashville, TN United States
 
Logic Pro X can't keep up (after upgrade?)
Monday, September 28 2015 @ 02:02 PM CDT

Using LPX on my MacBook Pro (2.66 GHz Core 2 Duo, 8GB RAM), I am seeing more frequent messages that “the audio engine can’t process all required data in time,” even when playing a project that contains about 17 software-synth tracks.   I have tried to address the problem by bouncing tracks down to audio and inserting the AIFF files into audio tracks.   (4 done so far.)   But the problem still occurs ... sporadically.   It might stop playback once, then not a second, third, or fourth time.

One of the tracks (Dirty Planet preset) seems to be based on Sculpture.   There are several different types of synth contributing to the project since, at this moment, I am merely assembling library presets that sound good.   I don’t seem to remember having this problem, at all, before updating to the latest version.   Any thoughts?   Superficially, it seems to me that this computer ought to be more-than “beefy” enough to handle this.
chikoppi
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Registered: 04/02/04
Posts: 1910
Location: N/A
 
Re:Logic Pro X can't keep up (after upgrade?)
Monday, September 28 2015 @ 05:27 PM CDT

I think sculpture is fairly resource intensive. Also, using 10 different synths seems to be more resource intensive than 10 instances of one synth.

If you have additional plugins on your synth channels (reverb, EQ, delay, etc.), try consolidating these into busses to cut down on the number of plugins.

“Ya, that idea is dildos.” Skwisgaar Skwigelf
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MikeRobinson
Forum Full Member


Registered: 08/29/11
Posts: 638
Location: Nashville, TN United States
 
Re:Logic Pro X can't keep up (after upgrade?)
Tuesday, September 29 2015 @ 12:24 PM CDT

Yeah, I looked at the mixer panel and the complexity there was “fairly ridiculous.”   Of course, that is what you get when you go for instant gratification   ;-)   with Library plugins.   For now, I just bumped everything down to audio tracks, and muted the sources.

What I don’t is ... when you mute a software-instrument track, does Logic actually ignore it, as though it were not there at all?   If there are a bunch of mixer channels and buses (from the Library auto-setup), associated with the now-muted tracks, do they continue to consume any CPU resources?
TobinMueller
Forum Full Member


Registered: 01/28/04
Posts: 1782
Location: Rowayton, CT USA
 
Re:Logic Pro X can't keep up (after upgrade?)
Wednesday, September 30 2015 @ 12:26 PM CDT

Quote by: MikeRobinson
...when you mute a software-instrument track, does Logic actually ignore it, as though it were not there at all?   If there are a bunch of mixer channels and buses (from the Library auto-setup), associated with the now-muted tracks, do they continue to consume any CPU resources?



Muting the track is supposed to keep the track from absorbing CPU. But as the file is opened, it loads the entire raft of things used on that track (if they are different than plugging and sounds used on other tracks), so, I am not so sure I believe it. When I bounce a track, I usually save a version of the file that actually deletes unused (but maybe wanted later) tracks, to help CPU. I save that trackless file, close out the program and reopen the new file, to make sure CPU is not used in any way for the desired bounce.

When I finish a project, I must have 20 versions of different drafts, etc., of a project. I carefully pick the file versions I want to save for posterity, then delete all the others, to save disc space, as well.
XMaramena
Forum Full Member


Registered: 11/22/10
Posts: 642
Location: Hitchin, United Kingdom
 
Re:Logic Pro X can't keep up (after upgrade?)
Thursday, October 01 2015 @ 03:15 PM CDT

I think Logic works best with less cores and more speed, rather than less speed and more cores - if you go to your transport and double click on the CPU bar, you'll get a more detailed bar graph of each thread. Even if things are running smoothly, it only takes just one thread to touch the top, for the entire application to stop.

I've found that it will often group certain plugins to certain threads - so it may group lots of sculptures on one thread, the lots of EXS on another, then lots of space designers on another, etc etc. So you can get a lot more out of your projects if you balance the instruments you choose.

Of course, no excuse for apple - you should be able to use what you like!
Daugrin
Forum Full Member


Registered: 03/24/09
Posts: 1120
Location: , Extraverse
 
Re:Logic Pro X can't keep up (after upgrade?)
Thursday, October 01 2015 @ 03:31 PM CDT

Here's a tip. Might work for you... Stop working on the master root project. Open a branch of the original. Bounce out the tracks you are happy with... delete the originals from the branch. You can retrieve them from the master if you want to change something. This method makes best use of resources, and, helps the artist stay focused for you are actually admitting that you are getting things done when you bounce the tracks. Best of luck.

Daug
tltate
Forum Newbie


Registered: 06/30/05
Posts: 9
Location: Charleston, South Carolina United States
 
Re:Logic Pro X can't keep up (after upgrade?)
Sunday, December 04 2016 @ 02:13 AM CST

Which processor do you have, the i5Core or i7Core? Would that make a difference?

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MikeRobinson
Forum Full Member


Registered: 08/29/11
Posts: 638
Location: Nashville, TN United States
 
Re:Logic Pro X can't keep up (after upgrade?)
Thursday, December 08 2016 @ 08:46 AM CST

The Logic preset patches ... yes, they sound lovely ... but they are meant to sound good by themselves, and also to be self contained so that they are easily removed.   Which might make them a great deal more elaborate than they need to be.   Once you have settled on what sounds you want to use, a little judicious “re-wiring” can greatly reduce the CPU load.   Also, listening to the thing to see if turning-off a particular switch actually makes a discernible-to-you difference.

I also made liberal use of “freezing” tracks, turning them into audio-file equivalents which of course take much less CPU.   (And I also found it interesting to look at those audio waveforms!   I only realized that one track must be clipping when I saw it bustin’ against the top of the strip.)