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Ejh
Forum Full Member


Registered: 05/24/05
Posts: 3482
Location: , MA USA
 
Re:Guitar Action & Setup
Saturday, November 22 2008 @ 05:08 PM CST

If you DO decide to sand the saddle down, use a sanding block. Helps keep it from sanding unevenly. I usually put the block and sandpaper down and do the moving with the saddle piece itself....

"We have to remember...when it's surrender that's called for, it's not surrender of your brains. It's surrender of your ego. It's a different thing." --Bruce Cockburn


 
Re:Guitar Action & Setup
Saturday, November 22 2008 @ 05:19 PM CST

Quote by: Ejh
If you DO decide to sand the saddle down, use a sanding block. Helps keep it from sanding unevenly. I usually put the block and sandpaper down and do the moving with the saddle piece itself....

Just what I was thinking... But I thought I'd put my dial calipers on it to measure & record the 1-3-4-6 string heights on it, and check the flatness on the bottom with a dial indicator before touching it...
Ejh
Forum Full Member


Registered: 05/24/05
Posts: 3482
Location: , MA USA
 
Re:Guitar Action & Setup
Saturday, November 22 2008 @ 05:24 PM CST

Quote by: Repulsive_Landlord
Quote by: Ejh
If you DO decide to sand the saddle down, use a sanding block. Helps keep it from sanding unevenly. I usually put the block and sandpaper down and do the moving with the saddle piece itself....

Just what I was thinking... But I thought I'd put my dial calipers on it to measure & record the 1-3-4-6 string heights on it, and check the flatness on the bottom with a dial indicator before touching it...



Oh...well...CALIPERS...and DIAL indicator...Right....Well, that WOULD be an alternative to the "mess around with it and swear when you screw it up terminallly" method that I employ...

Everybody's got their unique approach...

Ed

"We have to remember...when it's surrender that's called for, it's not surrender of your brains. It's surrender of your ego. It's a different thing." --Bruce Cockburn


 
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Saturday, November 22 2008 @ 06:04 PM CST

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Re:Guitar Action & Setup
Saturday, November 22 2008 @ 06:37 PM CST

Quote by: Ejh
Oh...well...CALIPERS...and DIAL indicator...Right....Well, that WOULD be an alternative to the "mess around with it and swear when you screw it up terminallly" method that I employ...

Everybody's got their unique approach...

Ed

heh... what do I know? (tryin too hard to make a science of it, I reckon)
Elevator_Funk
Forum Full Member


Registered: 01/24/08
Posts: 746
Location: N/A
 
Re:Guitar Action & Setup
Sunday, November 23 2008 @ 11:59 AM CST

Just go slow and do a little bit at a time, if you overdo it, you have to get a whole new saddle. Making the bottom flat is important if you like the tone of the guitar. That's also why you shouldn't put shims under the bridge if you file too much. Loss of tone.

If you are as good with your hands as you say, you'll do better than me. I'm horrible with things like that, and I've done it successfully.


 
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Sunday, November 23 2008 @ 05:37 PM CST

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Sunday, November 23 2008 @ 05:49 PM CST

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stratcat
Forum Full Member


Registered: 04/24/05
Posts: 150
Location: Lansing, IL United States
 
Re:Guitar Action & Setup
Monday, November 24 2008 @ 01:06 AM CST

I've always set up my own, but when I bought a new strat, my brother talked me into having it "professionally set up". When I took it in to the shop I told the tech how I wanted it, low action but no buzzing on the frets. When I finally got it back boy was I dissapointed. The guy set the action so low you couldnt play past the 12th fret without buzzing out. Man was I pissed. I ended up setting the action myself and I've come to the conclusion that nobody knows your instrument better than you do so learn how to do it and do it yourself.
 
jiguma
Forum Full Member


Registered: 05/08/05
Posts: 2695
Location: Pambula Beach, Sapphire Coast, NSW Australia
 
Re:Guitar Action & Setup
Monday, November 24 2008 @ 04:57 AM CST

Quote by: Ejh
Quote by: Repulsive_Landlord
Quote by: Ejh
If you DO decide to sand the saddle down, use a sanding block. Helps keep it from sanding unevenly. I usually put the block and sandpaper down and do the moving with the saddle piece itself....

Just what I was thinking... But I thought I'd put my dial calipers on it to measure & record the 1-3-4-6 string heights on it, and check the flatness on the bottom with a dial indicator before touching it...



Oh...well...CALIPERS...and DIAL indicator...Right....Well, that WOULD be an alternative to the "mess around with it and swear when you screw it up terminallly" method that I employ...

Everybody's got their unique approach...

Ed



I just very successfully used your method on the Seagull Ed, and am happy to say I stopped sanding just before I went too far. It sounds great now - but that's probably the new strings Smile - and so much easier to play.

Neil
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