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Daugrin
Forum Full Member


Registered: 03/24/09
Posts: 1117
Location: , Extraverse
 
Elvis Secret Sauce
Saturday, January 21 2017 @ 09:06 PM CST



This is the third installment in vocals. Hopefully, the broad overview on specific group styles helped ya figure out where ya belong. Expect to get back to that area soon for more suggestions.

Right now we are gonna start on the soloist. Elvis is the most popular singer of his generation hands down. Lots of issues with Elvis. He robbed the black musicians. He robbed the white musicians. After he got tons of money he bought whatever he thought was essential. Hold this notion. Elvis band was the best in the world. Elvis, and his handlers, were devoted to being the best. Driven to excel!

The first million sellers in the recording industry were opera records. People who could afford records dug opera. Elvis was never opera, yet by '69 he had taken operatic training. Not so in 1956. In '56 Elvis
had singing technique he learned on the gig. It's his secret sauce.

I can't teach you operatic techniques, in fact I won't suggest them for you. But in this clip you can learn Elvis' secret sauce. I will do the first 40 seconds. You can finish.

At 7 seconds the first "Me" is flavored with a vibrato. Let's call this vibrato style "one". Elvis has many.

The first time he sings "tender" he uses what we can call style "two". Style two includes an inflection.

Hear the trill on "Never"? Pure Elvis.

As he sings the first "so" you will detect the pitch falls off with vibrato- style "three".

At :38 is the killer. When he utters the word "all" he becomes the greatest, the most powerful entertainer, of his generation. He cries, "all" with a fall off in pitch and vibrato- style "four".

As you parse the rest of this little folk song, note Elvis' technique on every important word. Train yourself to "read" lyrics and add techniques to your performance as your inner ear directs. Never let an important word in your reading of a lyric pass by without a twist or turn. This will make your vocals sound more engaging, this record teaches that simple lesson.

This "lick" on the word "all" reappears in Smokey Robinson tunes and many Beatles numbers sung by John Lennon. Lennon borrowed much of his technique from Elvis and Robinson, and you can too...

Learn how to fish! Finish this little record off. Use yer ears and identify what
"The King" is putting down here. Then take yer new skills to yer favorite singers records, whether that might be Carl Wilson, for me Carl is the icon, or perhaps Wildman Fisher, or maybe Sinatra is your thing. Every singers' techniques can be parsed in this manner. I would suggest Bing Crosby and the Everly Brothers records to get started, you got to steal from the richest people or yer wasting time!

Now get to work! We can expect yer posts to get better the more shit ya steal. Get busy learning to make what ya got better! That is all Elvis did. He used his ears and borrowed, or bought everything he couldn't steal...

Daug
J.A.Stewart
Forum Full Member


Registered: 11/13/04
Posts: 4538
Location: Somewhere In Time, USA
 
Re:Elvis Secret Sauce
Sunday, January 22 2017 @ 01:51 PM CST

While I appreciate and support the idea of studying and learning from accomplished singers, I was surprised by your assertion that Elvis had operatic training. Everything I ever read about Elvis indicated he was self-trained.

Could you please provide a source for this revelation?

Ray Walker (of The Jordanaires) had this to say during an interview ...

"EIN – Do you know if Elvis had any other singing lessons apart from maybe Charlie Hodge singing with him in Germany?

RW – Well I guess Charlie showed Elvis how to get that high gospel-tenor type sound but, no, Elvis never had any formal voice lessons at all. However he was perfect at being able to do what you told him to do. Elvis knew that I had taught singing so he was never afraid to ask."



MY LATEST: A demo version of my Work-In-Progress DAILY GRIND
Daugrin
Forum Full Member


Registered: 03/24/09
Posts: 1117
Location: , Extraverse
 
Re:Elvis Secret Sauce
Wednesday, January 25 2017 @ 07:54 PM CST

Quote by: J.A.Stewart
While I appreciate and support the idea of studying and learning from accomplished singers, I was surprised by your assertion that Elvis had operatic training. Everything I ever read about Elvis indicated he was self-trained.

Could you please provide a source for this revelation?

Ray Walker (of The Jordanaires) had this to say during an interview ...

"EIN – Do you know if Elvis had any other singing lessons apart from maybe Charlie Hodge singing with him in Germany?

RW – Well I guess Charlie showed Elvis how to get that high gospel-tenor type sound but, no, Elvis never had any formal voice lessons at all. However he was perfect at being able to do what you told him to do. Elvis knew that I had taught singing so he was never afraid to ask."





As asserted in the above, compare the vocal techniques on this tune and the say the '69 TV Special. Clearly Elvis vocal technique blooms. He never stopped growing and learned operatic techniques which greatly improved his projection and intonation, listen for critical changes in his ability to sustain his vocal power over the soaring "best band" in the world from the '69 show.

Elvis was an autodidact, he learned on the gig, as clearly stated above, but ears tell us Elvis got technical training. Don't need a book to disclose that information.

The expectation that anyone can tell what Elvis learned from whom, or where is probably kinda silly. He had great ears, and stole, borrowed, or if you must learned, from everyone he ever met who had something he could use. That's the thing to get from this stuff, learn how to get stuff you can use on yer recordings...

Daug
J.A.Stewart
Forum Full Member


Registered: 11/13/04
Posts: 4538
Location: Somewhere In Time, USA
 
Re:Elvis Secret Sauce
Saturday, January 28 2017 @ 09:03 AM CST

Quote by: Daugrin
Quote by: J.A.Stewart
While I appreciate and support the idea of studying and learning from accomplished singers, I was surprised by your assertion that Elvis had operatic training. Everything I ever read about Elvis indicated he was self-trained.

Could you please provide a source for this revelation?

Ray Walker (of The Jordanaires) had this to say during an interview ...

"EIN – Do you know if Elvis had any other singing lessons apart from maybe Charlie Hodge singing with him in Germany?

RW – Well I guess Charlie showed Elvis how to get that high gospel-tenor type sound but, no, Elvis never had any formal voice lessons at all. However he was perfect at being able to do what you told him to do. Elvis knew that I had taught singing so he was never afraid to ask."





As asserted in the above, compare the vocal techniques on this tune and the say the '69 TV Special. Clearly Elvis vocal technique blooms. He never stopped growing and learned operatic techniques which greatly improved his projection and intonation, listen for critical changes in his ability to sustain his vocal power over the soaring "best band" in the world from the '69 show.

Elvis was an autodidact, he learned on the gig, as clearly stated above, but ears tell us Elvis got technical training. Don't need a book to disclose that information.

The expectation that anyone can tell what Elvis learned from whom, or where is probably kinda silly. He had great ears, and stole, borrowed, or if you must learned, from everyone he ever met who had something he could use. That's the thing to get from this stuff, learn how to get stuff you can use on yer recordings...

Daug



I'm not out to split hairs here, but it might have been more accurate to say that Elvis had incorporated operatic techniques in his performance — rather than conclude that he had "operatic training" — which implies a much broader commitment and regimen.

If you read Ray Walker's interview, he recounts an amusing episode when Elvis asked him to help him hit the high note on the power ending of the song, "Surrender." Walker's suggestions hardly took an operatic approach, but apparently proved effective.

What's clear is that Elvis was dedicated to his craft and constantly sought to improve his performance. That's a valuable lesson for any aspiring singer or musician. Wink

MY LATEST: A demo version of my Work-In-Progress DAILY GRIND
 
Daugrin
Forum Full Member


Registered: 03/24/09
Posts: 1117
Location: , Extraverse
 
Re:Elvis Secret Sauce
Monday, January 30 2017 @ 08:11 PM CST



Where did Elvis get his trick bag? Open yer ears my friends. He stole from everyone, on the gig and from records. This tune features most of the tricks Elvis squeezed into "Love Me Tender," and was recorded 6 years before the Elvis hit.
Jo Stafford enjoyed a long career in recording and entertainment. This tune is a great example of Stafford's artistry. She is featured, the arrangement is perfect, and think about how righteous this tune must have felt, especially to those people who had suffered the loss of a loved one. This was on post world war ll radio.
Compare the two tunes, both recordings are compelling in the same manner, yet are wildly different in style and appeal. There is gold here...

Daug