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Ed Hannifin
Forum Full Member


Registered: 05/24/05
Posts: 3474
Location: , MA USA
 
Norman Blake at 79
Tuesday, June 27 2017 @ 08:47 AM CDT

A lovely interview with a great musician and a thoughtful man...


https://www.premierguitar.com/articles/25480-norman-blake-still-keepin-it-real

"We have to remember...when it's surrender that's called for, it's not surrender of your brains. It's surrender of your ego. It's a different thing." --Bruce Cockburn
Ed Hannifin
Forum Full Member


Registered: 05/24/05
Posts: 3474
Location: , MA USA
 
Re:Norman Blake at 79
Thursday, June 29 2017 @ 07:29 AM CDT


"We have to remember...when it's surrender that's called for, it's not surrender of your brains. It's surrender of your ego. It's a different thing." --Bruce Cockburn
 
MikeRobinson
Forum Full Member


Registered: 08/29/11
Posts: 733
Location: Chattanooga, TN United States
 
Re:Norman Blake at 79
Thursday, June 29 2017 @ 04:57 PM CDT

I’ve lost touch with Norman.   Hmmm...

What many people don’t know about those days is that many now-famous musicians whose subsequent careers took them in many different more-commercial ways ... Jerry Garcia, say, and yes of course, Johnny Cash ... all started in the world of folk music, wrote many songs in the genre, and continued to keep a special fondness for it.

The whole damned music industry was feeling its way along back then, inventing itself, because AM Radio had only fairly-recently acquired “clear channel” capabilities, accompanied by vastly-increased transmitter power limits, that allowed them to successfully reach a very broad market and to enjoy a monopoly within those markets.   (Specifically including WSM, AM-650, still broadcasting from Nashville, Tennessee.)   Even though vinyl records were being produced and sold, the industry was only gradually beginning to learn how to “pigeon-hole” its artists and its playlists into the easily-digestable, predictable “brands” that we still have today.   They were still a long way from achieving the sales-volumes that drives the industry today, largely because the market was adolescent, too!

Norman got songwriter credit on enough songs that would be well-played by other people to enable him and Nancy to stay focused on the original folk-music thread themselves, without worrying about their next paycheck.   (And, he played on a lot of sessions.)   Then, they built a rich and lovely catalog of their own, and their own well-deserved following.   Although, yes, his voice is not what it used to be (and, Lord help us, neither was Johnny’s, although I daresay that JR’s final album was his best), he still knows how to play one helluva great live show.   Catch him if you can, while you can.   Both he and Nancy are truly delightful people who will make you feel welcome, and who genuinely love to do what they do best and to share it with you.   The two of them really are “the real deal.”