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magnatone
Forum Full Member


Registered: 02/08/08
Posts: 4356
Location: N/A
 
Re:Protest Songs
Monday, February 20 2017 @ 09:03 PM CST

Quote by: Daugrin
There is a Rolling Stones' tune "Casino Boogie" on "Exile" where Jagger sings, "Protest music, million dollar sad." Kinda sums up the protest music trip for me, anyway, he claims the phrase was literally pulled out of a hat of phrases during the writing process for this particular number. Ala William Burroughs.

Exactly what does being contrary mean? "Protest the President" for instance, means what?

Dissent, in the media we live with is not protest, it is confusion. Only approved dissent is permitted in the mass delusion. This approved dissent, or protest if you will, appears to
support decisions made by a group of Elites. Protest is simply propaganda. Dissent, or the search for the truth, is something else, and is not permitted: in the media, in schools, in the corporate workplace, in government, in what is published, in what is online. Test this yourself. Tell the truth somewhere. Just the idea is too scary to contemplate?

Flaming Lips protest the President in popular song (0). Flaming Lips cash-in by supporting the leftist propaganda campaign against the President (0). Same reality from two different perspectives?

The truth is somebody gets paid, we know this is true, cos we follow the money and dig William Burroughs... Jagger lies about "Casino Boogie", (which is labeled as a "confusing lyric" in the media), now because he actually told the truth in the number and he has a hard time living with truth. He prefers delusion, for himself and for you. Just makes things so much easier...

Daug



guess James won't be posting any protest songs

my most recent song: "First Light (solo piano)"
SmokeyVW
Forum Full Member


Registered: 06/13/06
Posts: 7004
Location: N/A
 
Re:Protest Songs
Monday, February 20 2017 @ 09:44 PM CST

..
SmokeyVW
Forum Full Member


Registered: 06/13/06
Posts: 7004
Location: N/A
 
Re:Protest Songs
Monday, February 20 2017 @ 09:49 PM CST

Daugrin
Forum Full Member


Registered: 03/24/09
Posts: 1117
Location: , Extraverse
 
Re:Protest Songs
Wednesday, February 22 2017 @ 08:35 AM CST



Protest music? There is a way to explain that Columbia Records in the 30s, 40s and as late as late 1960s created protest via publishing specific records, especially in regional markets. Perhaps this discussion is a bit beyond the depth of a forum post. But you can research the idea. It is even in books lol.

Lots of lively discussion. People have opinions here and I am proud of everyone for making MJs a place where ideas can be discussed. Not always been the case here at MJ...
Certainly this is not the case on the internet at large.

Here is a fresh challenge. Is the above a hit piece? Or does it neatly feed into a narrative, a portion of the power elite on the left is pushing, or simply part of a series of meme you might encounter in the media today?

Those of us that dig Woody G, think of Woody G as a famous protestor, we find this vid right in his wheelhouse, especially in terms of the method of public discourse, and idiom Woody pioneered. Yet is it protest? Or hate speech?
Perhaps it is consensus building? Or something else again?

Daug
Dadai.2
Forum Full Member


Registered: 09/09/08
Posts: 1716
Location: Nowhere land...,
 
Re:Protest Songs
Wednesday, February 22 2017 @ 07:51 PM CST

Well Daug, regarding that protest song, as George Harrison remarked concerning the Maharishi and his input during the Beatles India visit - "not too subtle."

Here's a Carole King subtle protest song. Question for the listener - What is she protesting? Lyrics kinda make you think...

Go Away Sam

smug moral posturing & virtue signaling? nope...
MikeRobinson
Forum Full Member


Registered: 08/29/11
Posts: 624
Location: Nashville, TN United States
 
Re:Protest Songs
Wednesday, February 22 2017 @ 08:29 PM CST

So, does my “Young Men, White Gloves (YMWG)” song qualify as “a protest song?”   I certainly hope that it does.   (And, I still hope someday to sell it, but I digress ...)

Back in the 1950’s and 60’s, your protests were overshadowed by one all-important consideration:   y-o-u could get drafted.”   Therefore, quite a few “protest songs” from that period were, very simply, a musical expression of the purely-personal desire to save one’s purely-personal asterisk.

After “Tricky Dick™” put the immediate and immediately-personal threat of conscription on the table, “protest songs” a la Bob Dylan, IMHO, lost a lot of their mojo.   The average listener now knew that he no longer had his own “skin in the game.”   Protest songs, then, had to become a bit more abstract.   They could no longer rest upon the fears of a nineteen-year-old who each day opened his mailbox in dread of seeing the words:   “Greeting:”

To me, “a protest song” should today capture an idea that is fundamentally wrong, so that it might resonate with anyone and with everyone who encounters it.   For instance, I remain offended by the billboard advertisements ... for the Marine Corps, for the National Guard, for whomever ... which either altogether-remove the possibility that the soldier in question might die on some beach somewhere, or that delegate his sacrifice to some perverse episode of Batman.
Daugrin
Forum Full Member


Registered: 03/24/09
Posts: 1117
Location: , Extraverse
 
Re:Protest Songs
Wednesday, February 22 2017 @ 08:32 PM CST

Indeed a lot of protest music has been sold.
Perhaps you are ready to move deeper? What is the artists responsibility?
The classic protest song "Ohio" by CSNY presents an interesting problem. Was the release of this protest song somehow irresponsible? The song can be directly linked to the deaths of several protestors in events that followed the songs climb on the charts. The song fomented violence.
People who were five feet from the girl who was shot at Kent State have made very public that the concerns in the Neil Young penned protest song had little to do with the actual events on that day.
The response to the song in Nashville was very different from L.A. What is the complaint?
The message is protest and rage, the events of Kent State and the cultural narrative of the protest movement made money and power for CSNY. Again, historically the people at Kent State found the song failed to represent their protest.
Was "Ohio" a distraction from the real issues, as those from Kent would suggest? Or did NY just tap into the movement and score a big sale? Perhaps his righteous indignation represented what most movement types, outside the real dissent, as voiced by the people at Kent State, felt? You decide, if you can wrap yer head around the argument.
Running into a theater and yelling, "Fire," is one kind of act. Profiting off the deaths of protestors by co-opting their experience and selling a message of hate for the mass media is another? That's real protest!

Daug
chikoppi
Forum Full Member


Registered: 04/02/04
Posts: 1908
Location: N/A
 
Re:Protest Songs
Wednesday, February 22 2017 @ 10:32 PM CST

Got it. Songs that express a position "for" or "against" something are all tools of the elites to control/agitate/pacify the masses.

Artists who sell songs that express a position "for" or "against" something are either witless tools or hypocritical monsters.

People who buy songs are incapable of forming their own opinions and instead think whatever the voice in the speakers tells them to think.

Of course, it's possible that the artists themselves are participants in society and write topical songs that reflect the things they see, hear, and think about. It's possible that those songs reflect, however imperfectly, the sentiments of others at the time. But where's the fun entertaining that idea, eh?

Was Toby Keith's "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue" a sincere and personal expression of good 'ol boy patriotism or a cynical and jingoistic cash grab?

Here's the tricky part...who cares? Toby didn't create the demand for that sentiment and neither did his label. That song was successful because it gave voice to a sentiment that a significant portion of people wanted to express at the time.

Once that song got released it was no longer his to define. People invested it with meaning of their own (positively, negatively, or with indifference).

Playing Judas Priest backwards makes otherwise emotionally well-adjusted people worship satan and commit suicide. Fact. Just like a protest song makes otherwise reasonable and docile people commit violence. Fact. Got it.


“Ya, that idea is dildos.” Skwisgaar Skwigelf
GET SONG FEEDBACK --> MacJams Critics Circles
davisamerica
Forum Full Member


Registered: 09/02/07
Posts: 4166
Location: some where, ..... France
 
Re:Protest Songs
Thursday, February 23 2017 @ 06:41 PM CST


to be clear here on lyrics ...

I have finally figured this out but now I have forgotten what to use it for.
 
davisamerica
Forum Full Member


Registered: 09/02/07
Posts: 4166
Location: some where, ..... France
 
Re:Protest Songs
Thursday, February 23 2017 @ 06:50 PM CST


I have finally figured this out but now I have forgotten what to use it for.