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Fifty Ways to Say the Same Thing


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Description
My old Gibson archtop. Recorded with the built in mic on my iMac. (Not the fancy homemade mic stand and amp you see in the pic.) Recorded a rhythm track, then a solo track trying not to repeat myself.
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Song Stats
Hits: 2050
Comments: 2
Fans: 0
Plays: 133
Downloads: 73
Votes: 5
Uploaded: Nov 01, 2004 - 02:15:10 PM
Last Updated: Sep 23, 2013 - 08:21:56 PM Last Played: Jul 03, 2019 - 12:37:23 AM
Song License
Creative Commons License:
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike

Creative Commons

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Hardware:
iMac
Software:
Garage Band
Comments
macapa said 5432 days ago (November 1st, 2004)
Very nice
Cool, has a good rythm. All around fun for the whole
family! :-)

Seriously, very nice playing.
Mike Herr said 5432 days ago (November 1st, 2004)
Very nice
Thanks for your kind comments. Glad you enjoyed it. I'm surprised "Day
Off Again" showed up in the new songs, because I posted this second
version weeks ago. This was a little practice session, the first time I did a
rhythm track in GB and played over it. The first version was out of sync
due to latency problems (I used the built in mic on my iMac) and had a
somewhat annoying maracas track, which I deleted this time around.
Shifting the melody guitar part ever so slightly seems to have fixed the
latency problem. To my ear it sounds like the two tracks are sync'd up
pretty well. I wish I hadn't panned both tracks to the far left and right.
They sound a little too separated to me. Should be more overlap like you
would hear in a live setting. Anyway, thanks again for your kind words
and rating.
Check out my latest song called September Sundays
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Name: mike herr
Location: Lititz PA USA
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Genre Info
The blues is a vocal and instrumental form of music based on a pentatonic scale and a characteristic twelve-bar chord progression. The form evolved in the United States in the communities of former African slaves from spirituals, praise songs, field

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